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News & Stories

15
Jun
2021

从家居到户外 提升年长者的行动力 (Improving seniors’ mobility at home and outdoors)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

zbLOHAS cover story on what caregivers can look out for to improve their elderly loved ones’ mobility at home and outdoors. The article includes tips on fall prevention and improving strength.


Dr Beatrix Wong, Associate Consultant, Division of Geriatric Medicine, NUH, explained that multiple parts of the body work together to keep a person mobile, and listed the possible reasons why a senior may want to seek help from the doctor. She also elaborated on the emergency steps to take if a senior falls at home.


Sonia Kurien, Occupational Therapist, JCH, commented that when choosing an appropriate mobility device, caregivers need to consider factors like the budget, the assistance rendered by caregivers, the distance travelled, whether it fits on public transport and the maintenance of the devices. Caregivers can consult the patient’s doctor who can refer the senior-in-need to an occupational therapist. She also shared that at home, caregivers need to be mindful of their loved ones’ medications and side effects. She provided tips on how to promote a healthy lifestyle at home, emphasising on the importance of proper footwear and home modifications. Outside the house, caregivers can accompany seniors when they are in public spaces to boost their self-confidence so that they are not confined to being at home.


Jeremy Mok, Senior Physiotherapist, AH, commented that fitness corners at HDB estate are equipped with machines that are suited for seniors. Equipment such as the hip swing, shoulder wheels and stationary cycling are helpful to maintain mobility in the hip, shoulder and knee. The article also included photo illustrations of simple home exercises to improve cardiovascular fitness, strength and mobility.


Registration details of JCH’s virtual caregiver talk titled “Improving the Mobility of our Loved Ones” happening on 26 June 2021 are listed in the article.

Media ArticlesNUHS in the NewsJurongHealth Campus In The NewsJCH In The News
14
Jun
2021

移植手术因疫情喊停 去年器官捐赠减少 (Organ donations decreased last year due to suspension of transplant surgeries during pandemic)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​国家心脏中心、国大医院器官移植中心和杜克—新加坡国立大学移植中心指出,它们分别在去年2月我国启动橙色警戒级别和4月启动病毒阻断措施时,被迫暂停非紧急的器官移植手术,直到疫情减缓后才逐渐恢复。

Media ArticlesNUH in the News
14
Jun
2021

Doc on Eriksen, who had cardiac arrest: He was gone, we got him back

The New Paper © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

The New Paper mentioned a tweet posted by Asst Prof Yeo Tee Joo, Director of Cardiac Rehabilitation, Department of Cardiology, NUHCS, which stated that early recognition, prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and defibrillation “saves lives regardless of aetiology of cardiac arrest”. He added that these are extremely important knowledge and skill that all should have.

Media ArticlesNUHCS in the NewsNUHS in the News
14
Jun
2021

Can we pass Covid-19 to our pets?

The Straits Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​Prof Paul Tambyah, Department of Medicine, NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, helped to address common questions about animals and COVID-19. He shared that there are very few reports of an animal passing COVID-19 back to humans, though there were reports of mink farmers in northern Europe infected by strains that moved from humans to mink and back to humans. He advised that if there is any suspicion that a pet has COVID-19, the National Parks Board’s animal and veterinary services can be contacted. It conducts biosurveillance and is able to do the right kind of polymerase chain reaction testing for Sars-CoV-2 in animals. 

Media ArticlesNUHS in the News
14
Jun
2021

Open for business? The trouble with bringing down China’s coronavirus travel barriers

Others

​A/Prof Hsu Li Yang, Vice-Dean of Global Health, SSHSPH, said that even if a country achieved herd immunity, clusters and cases would not be ruled out as these clusters would most likely be self-limited if they develop. A/Prof Hsu added that it will soon be known if vaccinating the majority of adults will be sufficient to limit the spread of highly transmissible variants of concern, or more practicably, limit hospitalisation and death. 

Media ArticlesNUHS in the News
13
Jun
2021

爱雍乌节300余商家员工陆续到商场接受检测 (More than 300 ION Orchard Staff get tested COVID-19)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​Prof Teo Yik Ying, Dean of NUS Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, commented how the infections at ION Orchard may become a new shopping mall cluster similar to Jurong East JEM and Westgate shopping malls. He said that the temporary closure of the malls in addition to cleaning and disinfection can help to prevent virus transmissions from people movement. He opined that the closure of shopping malls may become more common in the next few months until a higher proportion of the population has been vaccinated. 

Media ArticlesNUHS in the News
13
Jun
2021

勤勤恳恳战战兢兢中 樟宜机场员工等待蓝天 (Changi Airport employees eagerly wait for blue skies)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​Prof Teo Yik Ying, Dean of NUS Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, explained that infection clusters in Singapore will be closed if there is no linked case detected within two rounds of incubation period of 28 days. As the last linked case from the Changi Airport Cluster was detected on 22 May, the cluster will be closed if there is no new linked case by 19 June. 

Media ArticlesNUHS in the News
12
Jun
2021

Conspiracy theories, scientific misinterpretations, plain ignorance abound in Covid-19 infodemic

TODAY Online

On why scientists cannot categorically state that COVID-19 vaccines do not cause death in order to lay mistruths to rest, Prof Teo Yik Ying, Dean of NUS Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, explained that there is a clear difference between proof of absence and the absence of proof. He said it is one thing to issue a statement such as “in all the participants in the clinical trials, we have not observed a death event”, as opposed to “this vaccine does not cause death in anyone who takes it”. He added that there is a need to systematically review the evidence of any mortality event that is suspected to be linked to the vaccines to understand whether taking the vaccine caused the fatality. Because proper science takes time, it thus falls to a close partnership among responsible scientists, responsible media and trusted public agencies to be agile in responding to fake news in the meantime.
 
TODAY also cited A/Prof Jeremy Lim of NUS Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health who noted that in public communications, it is important to share views and recognise alternative ways of interpreting data as well as be clear why one disagrees with certain points made. 


Media ArticlesNUHS in the News
12
Jun
2021

Understanding why some people are not taking Covid-19 vaccines and how to gain their confidence

TODAY Online

TODAY shared how the virtual public forum organised by NUS Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health with the support of the Rotary Club of Singapore (RCS) helped to address COVID-19 vaccine misinformation, questions and doubts to increase vaccine confidence. The event also marked the official launch of the Public Health Ambassador Programme where NUS Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health experts would be training over 150 participants with public health knowledge and skills to help the communities to better weather the many ongoing challenges of COVID-19. 

Media ArticlesNUHS in the News
12
Jun
2021

理解疫苗政策的变化 (Making sense of changes in vaccine policies)

Berita Harian © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​Commentary by Prof Teo Yik Ying, Dean of NUS Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, highlighted that Singapore's recent flurry of COVID-19 vaccination strategies, along with MOH advisory changes, were the result of successful negotiations for faster vaccine deliveries. Prof Teo noted that there were discussions on the Sinovac vaccine which has been allowed for use in Singapore but not put on the national vaccination programme. Prof Teo opined that sharing WHO’s consideration in granting the Emergency Use Listing approval as well as HSA’s evaluation criteria could help clarify the matter. He added that it is important to have transparent and adequate communications with the public when there are changes to national policies on COVID-19 vaccines.

Media ArticlesNUHS in the News
12
Jun
2021

施打第二剂 4 年轻男子现心脏炎症 (Four young men had heart inflammation after receiving their second dose of COVID-19 vaccine)

新明日报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

In an interview with Shin Min Daily News,Prof Tan Huay Cheem, Director and Senior Consultant, National University Heart Centre Singapore and Chairman, Singapore Heart Foundation shared that myocarditis is a common condition with asymptomatic symptoms and they are generally related to viral infections. 

Prof Tan explained that further studies and investigations are ongoing and current available data suggests that most cases are mild. Patients recover without the need for significant intervention and do not suffer any long-term effects.

He said symptoms of myocarditis usually appear on the same or next day after vaccination, but it is very rare.  He suggested to drink plenty of water, get sufficient rest and to wait three to four days before resuming any strenuous physical activity even if the individual does not experience any symptoms. He urged the public to seek medical attention should they experience chest pain for up to two hours after the vaccination.

Media ArticlesNUHCS in the NewsNUHS in the News
11
Jun
2021

Art competition on organ donation

Tabla! © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​Aanya Rao, a 15-year-old NPS International student, runs an organisation called Art:Connect which aims to link student art and healthcare. It is now collaborating with the National University Centre For Organ Transplantation (NUCOT) at the National University Hospital on a programme to spread awareness about organ donation among the youth.

Media ArticlesNUH in the News
11
Jun
2021

抗疫重中之重 解读冠病疫苗 (Top priority in the pandemic fight – understanding COVID-19 vaccines)

Others

Commentary by Prof Tan Huay Cheem, Senior Consultant, NUHCS outlined how the COVID-19 virus affects the body, the types of vaccines available and how they work. Prof Tan said that the best way to fight against this pandemic is to go for vaccination as our body will produce antibodies to fight off the virus when infected. Prof Tan also discussed the efficacy of the COVID-19 vaccines, possible side effects, and how people with heart disease can still go for vaccination.

Media ArticlesNUHCS in the NewsNUHS in the News
11
Jun
2021

专家:分阶段放宽措施 可避免社区传播再现 (Expert: Easing measures in phases can avoid re-emergence of community transmission)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

Lianhe Zaobao quoted Prof Teo Yik Ying, Dean of NUS Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, who commented that although the number of community cases has been going down, the situation is not completely under control, especially with the Delta (B16172) variant strain being more transmissible. He urged everyone to remain vigilant even when they visit their family members for the upcoming Father’s Day.
 
Dr Louisa Sun, Infectious Diseases Associate Consultant at AH, added that as vaccinations are still underway, it is not possible to return to Phase 3 immediately; the effectiveness of each step taken should be evaluated before advancing to the next.


Media ArticlesNUHS in the News
11
Jun
2021

Latest strategy is geared towards living with Covid-19 virus

The New Paper © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

Asst Prof Hannah Clapham, NUS Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, said that a careful, calibrated adjustment of a good suite of measures with intensities that change as case numbers, transmissions and vaccinations in the population change, is a sensible way forward.  A/Prof Alex Cook, Vice-Dean of Research, added the strategy for the next and hopefully final stage of the pandemic is to move away from restriction that are broad-based, costly and socially damaging and rely on vaccination and targeted measures instead.
 
Prof Dale Fisher, Department of Medicine, NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, emphasised the importance of the vaccination programme. At a community level, vaccinations will allow Singapore to avoid circuit breakers, remove more social restrictions, and eventually open its borders.


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